Home > How the Earth Works > Setting Rules to Protect Earth (1) How Do We Solve the World's Problems?

How the Earth Works

Setting Rules to Protect Earth

(1) How Do We Solve the World's Problems?

Right now, more than 7 billion people live on planet Earth. Many of those people, including children, live in a place where they can't go to school or find enough food or water to survive. (One child under the age of five dies every six seconds!) On the other hand, there are other people in the world who have more than they need—so much that waste is a real problem!

How can we get everyone on Earth to share the resources that are necessary for life, but without destroying the environment in the process?

UN Headquarters in New York, the US. The world's leaders discuss solutions to the world's problems here.

UN Headquarters in New York, the US. The world's leaders discuss solutions to the world's problems here.
Photo by USAID_IMAGES. Some rights reserved.

One mechanism created to solve the world's problems is the United Nations (UN). The UN was founded in 1945 at the end of World War II with the mission of creating a world without war. Almost every country around the globe (193 countries) is now a member of the UN.

Eliminating war and conflict is certainly not enough to achieve balance and harmony between all people. Problems like global warming and biodiversity loss, for example, require discussion and cooperation between the nations of the world.

For this reason, the UN is where the world's leaders discuss solutions to the world's problems, and set goals and rules to achieve them. For example, the member countries of the UN agreed on a set of rules, or treaty, called the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) to address global warming. They also agreed on a treaty called the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to protect living organisms and their habitats.

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